2018/12/31

Welcome to Paradise !

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Welcome to Gokuraku 極楽 the Buddhist Paradise !

I will try and introduce information about the life of Shakyamuni Buddha
and a glossary of terms, many of them are kigo for Japanese haiku.

Paradise, Heaven 極楽 gokuraku and Hell 地獄  jigoku

ano yo あの世 the other world
haraiso はらいそ paradise (paraiso)
higan 彼岸 the other shore
joodo 浄土 Paradise of Amida
ka no yo かの世 the other world
. meido 冥土 冥途 the other world / yomi 黄泉 "the yellow springs" .
paradaisu パラダイス paradise, Paradies
raise 来世 afterlife, the world to come
rakuen 楽園 paradise, earthly paradise
shigo no sekai 死後の世界 the world after death
takai 他界 to die, to pass into the other world
tengoku 天国 heaven
tenjoo 天上 "up there", heaven

. toogen 桃源 Shangri-La シャングリラ, Arcadia, Eden - Toogenkyoo 桃源郷 fairyland, .
桃源郷 lit. Peach Blossom Valley

. Tokoyo no Kuni 常世国, 常世の国 The Eternal Land (of Shintoism) .
yomi 黄泉 the yellow springs, die Gelben Quellen
yuutopia ユートピア Utopia


And in the limbo toward the other world here are a lot of vengeful spirits, monsters and goblins.

. jigoku 地獄 Buddhist hell - Introduction .
naraku ならく / 奈落 hell, hades


. Pilgrimages in Japan - Introduction .


. - - - Glossary of Terms - - - . - not yet in the ABC index.


Your comments and help are most welcome!

Gabi Greve
GokuRakuAn 極楽庵, Japan



. Gokuraku Joodoo 極楽浄土 Gokuraku Jodo, Paradise in the West of Amida Nyorai .



..............................................................................................................................................


- - - - - ABC - Table of Contents - - - - -

- AAA - / - BBB - / - CCC - / - DDD - / - EEE -

- FFF - / - GGG - / - HHH - / - I I I - / - JJJ -

- KK KK - / - LLL - / - MMM - / - NNN - / - OOO -

- PPP - / - QQQ - / - RRR - / - SSS - / - TTT -

- UUU - / - VVV - / - WWW - / - XXX - / - YYY - / - ZZZ -


. Reference, LINKS - General Information .


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::





. Join the Jizo Bosatsu Gallery - Facebook .






. Join the Kannon Bosatsu Gallery on facebook .





. Join the Onipedia Demons on facebook .


under construction - please come back!
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- #gokuraku #jigoku #heavenandhell -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2018/12/29

General Information

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

General Information and Reference


- - - - - - - - - - Latest Additions - - -

. Darumapedia - Temples and Gokuraku .

....................................................................................................................................................



A Tourist Guidebook to Paradise  
GokuRaku no Kankoo Annai 極楽の観光案内 by 西村公朝 Nishimura Kocho



::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

- - - - - - - - - - External LINKS - - -


Buddhism in Japan - Buddha Statues - an extensive guide

A-TO-Z PHOTO DICTIONARY
source : Mark Schumacher



Buddhist Art News - Japan
News on Buddhist art, architecture, archaeology, music, dance, and academia.
- source : buddhistartnews.wordpress.com




地獄と極楽がわかる本 - to understand hell and heaven
source : futabasha.co.jp

..............................................................................................................................................

A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism
William E. Deal, Brian Ruppert




- quote -
Review by Jonathan Ciliberto
Intended for “upper-level undergraduate and graduate students as well as scholars,” A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism fills a gap by presenting largely recent work of Japanese and Western scholars on Japanese Buddhism. The authors consider prior books on Buddhist cultural history as largely from Indian and Tibetan viewpoints. The particular presumptions, intellectual models, or even prejudices of such positions (e.g., to view Japanese Buddhism as a distant reflection, or a corruption, of a continental original) are seen as obstacles to an accurate history of Buddhism’s influence and interaction with Japan.

The great value of the book is to direct readers to approaches and theories perhaps overlooked by more general histories of Buddhism. Each chapter includes its own bibliography and notes, making the book useful for study of narrow sections of Japan’s history.

Published in 2015, many summaries of and citations to recent scholarship are incorporated. Although a relatively short volume (~200 pages, absent notes and biolographies), it includes a great deal of purely historical information surrounded by “cultural history,” covering Japan from protohistory to the present. The book includes a character glossary.

Some themes that run through the book are: that Buddhism in Japan was not a monolithic “ism,” and that individual sects were not exclusive of one another but rather interacted in practice and doctrine; the complex interaction of indigenous religion with Buddhism; Buddhist lineages in Japan as the agents of cultural influence (e.g., “lineages had already begun to pursue the possibility of an ultimate deity”).

Many chapters include subsections on women and gender in Japanese Buddhism, including a fascinating section on the link between literary salons “established in women’s circles” and often held within monasteries and creating an environment for “the evolving and intimate connection between monastic Buddhists and their lay supporters” (102-4). More generally, these sections illustrate the important influence of women on Japanese Buddhism throughout its history. The book also devotes substantial attention to religion in Japan in the modern period, a much-needed resource.

One instance of a simplification of Japanese history that the authors seek to correct is the view that Shinto and Buddhism remained largely separate strands. While the doctrine of honji-suijaku is relatively well-known, the book reveals in greater depth the complex interplay between the two religions by reference to the writings of recent (and less-recent) scholars.

Another attempt to reveal subtlety beyond a stock scholarly view concerns (in the Heian period) the “limitations of the ‘rhetoric of decadence’ [that] some scholars attribute to ‘old’ Buddhism”. The authors offer Minamoto no Tamenori’s (d. 1101) Sanbo’e as an attempt “to incorporate other parts of the populace” beyond the aristocracy. This undercuts the claim that “practitioners of the ‘old’ Buddhism were completely unconcerned with those outside their walls” as a cause of the emergence of “religious heroes” (like Kukai and Nichiren) (88-90). (That said, the ongoing theme of Japanese Buddhists, unsatisfied with the quality of teaching in Japan, who sought original texts and more authoritative teachers in China, does support the basis of a kind of “decadent” Buddhism.)

It is important to have a sense of what “cultural history” is, or what it intends to do, before considering the authors’ approach to a history Japanese Buddhism. Given that cultural history includes an extremely wide set of approaches, determining the present authors’ use of it as a method is largely about picking out strands from the mass of possibilities. (One author refers to “the notorious difficulty of organizing the disorderly profusion of intradisciplinary, cross-disciplinary, and varying national-intellectual meanings and understandings of the “culture concept” into anything resembling consensual form” [Geoffrey Eley, “What Is Cultural History?”, New German Critique, No. 65, Cultural History/Cultural Studies, Spring – Summer, 1995, pp. 19-36].)

While the authors don’t set out their approach, generally in the present volume they tend to consider Buddhism in Japan less in terms of its religious or spiritual character or content and more as a generator of social and political forms. Or, rather, it is unspoken that religion was the driving force in developing myriad cultural effects in Japan, but the book doesn’t linger on religion itself, as it does on these effects.

It is unclear whether this approach is based on the position described by the scholar of medieval Japanese Buddhism Bernard Faure when he refers to an “absolute standpoint” as a “contradiction in terms” (Faure, Visions of Power (2000), 9). (Faure is frequently cited in A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism.) That is: there are no “religious” standpoints motivating individuals, in terms of absolute or ideal concepts, or at least that taking direction from such standpoints is delusional.

Faure’s view (following from Le Goff) is that “literary and artistic works of art (and, in the case of religion, ritual practice) do no represent any eternal, unitary reality, but rather are the products of the imagination of those who produce them” (Faure, 10, emphasis added). A similar view of religion advocates a “History of Religions approach – trying to figure out how and why certain forms of religiosity took shape the way they did instead of assuming that it was religious experience that made religion” (Alan Cole, Fathering Your Father (2009), xi).

Thus, Faure and historians who follow his approach write religious history absent of religion as an internal activity, aimed at self-improvement, transcendental, or altruistic. Or perhaps this approach simply considers individual “religious” experiences too personal, too psychologically opaque, to form the basis of historical inquiry, and thus discards consideration of such experiences as “religious” in nature, and instead consider them in mainly terms of materiality and politics.

The authors of A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism follow more directly the historian Kuroda Toshio’s sociopolitical functionalist approach. While occasionally offering descriptions of Buddhist practice and doctrine, the book largely focuses on: state-control over and connection with Buddhism in Japan (“Buddhism was firmly controlled by the state” during the early period (66)); art as narrative or purely visual, rather than a function of practice (99); Buddhist practice as a means of gaining influence or power at court, and the claim that “undoubtably” the introduction of esoteric lineages was related to the royal court’s interest in such power(106); that the court drove ritual (“Pivotal organizational and philosophical changes begin to arise in the royal court with the consolidation of the annual court ceremonies” (88, 106)).

Throughout, the authors take pains to connect influential Buddhists with the court: “The Daigoji halls, like those in other major monasteries, primarily housed scions of Fujiwara and Minamoto heritage” (107); “The Shingon lineages, from a very early point, […] had a special connection with the royal line” (108); “the intimate association between Tendai’s Enryakuji (Hiei) and the leading Fujiwaras” (108). Every monk who was a member of a royal family is identified in such a manner.

The author’s de-emphasis on “religious” explanations for religious history in Japan is intended to counterbalance writers who rely too much on such explanations. Citing the notable effect of D.T. Suzuki’s presentation of Zen Buddhism to the West (absurdist, gnomic, iconoclastic), and pointing out that “few Japanese Zen adherents, except those in the modern period and particularly those with access to the writings of Suzuki translated into Japanese” would recognize it, the author’s more social-science approach finds some justification. (146-7).

Performance theory is connected with the authors’ approach. A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism doesn’t lay any groundwork for the reader as to what the doctrine or technique of applying performance theory are. It is a notoriously amorphous field of inquiry. One description of the approach states that “the performative nature of societies around the world, how events and rituals as well as daily life [are] all governed by a code of performance,” and one sees how this aligns with Deal and Ruppert’s approach in the present volume: religious acts are not generated by authenticity, but rather are ritualized and “for show.” Performance theory is difficult to understand as contributing much to an analysis of history, since all human action is outward, and thus all actions are, in a literal sense, “performed.” The negative application of the theory is applied in the present volume: performance theory supports the strategy of avoiding examination the motivations, hearts, or minds of individual in Japanese Buddhist history.

This is a strategy for writing history, and indicates the above-mentioned scholarly caution, perhaps, but also it tends to paint individuals as acting according to a plan (or with hindsight), rather than by caprice, calling, sincerity, compassion, or irrationality. Perhaps it doesn’t matter, in terms of cultural history, whether or not an effect was caused by religion or some other motivation, but only that the effect did occur.

With regard to Buddhist art, the authors acknowledge – particularly as to poetry – that the “undoubted” motivation for including Buddhist themes was a recognition of the contrast between non-attachment and the “intoxication of those who made use of or found beauty in the linguistic arts” (102). Oddly – although in keeping with the author’s “non-religious” approach to religious art – the idea that such an aesthetic intoxication is meant exactly to advance individuals’ practice (e.g., through visualization) is never mentioned, with respect to poetry or any other art form.
- source : Buddhist Art News -

- reference -

..............................................................................................................................................


CLICK for more books !


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


BUDDHISM & SHINTŌISM IN JAPAN
A-TO-Z PHOTO DICTIONARY OF JAPANESE RELIGIOUS SCULPTURE & ART

- source : Mark Schumacher



Digital Dictionary of Buddhism - 電子佛教辭典 / Edited by A. Charles Muller
sign in as guest
- source : www.buddhism-dict.ne

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- #books #links #reference -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2018/05/10

priests speaking Chinese

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Japanese priests speaking Chinese

- quote -
Does anyone know of any sources mentioning the use of spoken Chinese
in Kamakura Zen circles?


Tachi notes that in the late Heian period, there was no opportunity to study vernacular Chinese in Japan. But he lists up several monks who traveled to China, among them Kakua (who learned to speak Chinese while being in Japan), Eisai/Yōsai (who probably spoke Chinese, although there is no written proof to support this), and Shunjō, who again learned spoken Chinese while in China and apparently used it later for rituals that he instituted at Sennyūji. Since Eisai invited Shunjō to Kennin-ji, there is a certain possibility that he taught spoken Chinese to its monks. 260-261

Whether Dōgen was able to witness rituals conducted in Chinese at Kennin-ji is unclear, but there is a document showing that he studied with Shunjō. He may have used this opportunity to familiarize himself with spoken Chinese before traveling to China. 262

Rankei Dōryū did not speak Japanese, in his temples (Jufuku-ji, Jōraku-ji and Kenchō-ji), he apparently used Chinese for his lectures and in ritual life. It should be noted that Dōryū was accompanied by a couple of younger monks, and that there is evidence that a certain number of other Chinese monks were traveling to Japan at this time (1240s). 263

However, there is an episode from the recorded sayings of Dōryū showing that, while he taught in Chinese, he could not expect his disciples to understand, and pointed them to a Japanese monk for further explanation in their own language. Tachi emphasizes that this episode belongs to the early stage after the founding of Kenchōji, and that Dōryū, who lived in Japan for 33 years, subsequently learned the language. The use of sōrō in his recorded sayings bears testimony to his efforts in this regard, as does a passage from the record of Mugaku Sogen. In other words, in later stages of his Japanese career, Dōryū apparently taught in the Japanese language, but continued to use Chinese on occasions of formal teaching, such as in his jōdō and shōsan. 263-265

Later records show, however, that even after decades, the teaching delivered in Chinese was not understood by the monks, and added information in Japanese was necessary. 266-267 Even close attendants of the Chinese masters at Kenchō-ji were not able to follow conversations in Chinese and used written exchanges to communicate with the master. 268

The same holds for Mugaku Sogen: he used a Japanese monk conversant in Chinese to have him explain his teachings to the assembly. All in all, Tachi finds that the Chinese masters in Kenchō-ji up to the fifth generation used Chinese for their teaching, esp. on formal occasions, but had to have it translated to the assembly in order for their larger audience to understand it. 269-270.

What about the language capacities of the monks who went to China? Kakua had no oppotunity to learn spoken Chinese before his travels. Eisai may have acquired some basic capacities in his two months in Hakata before his first trip, and Dōgen at Kennin-ji and Sennyū-ji. Enni Ben'en again probably studied basic spoken Chinese with a merchant in Hakata. All of them achieved a certain degree of fluency while in China. There were others, however, who never learned spoken Chinese. 272-273

It is unclear whether Dōgen used Chinese in his formal, jōdō teachings. What is obvious is that he often quotes Chinese cases without kundoku transformation in the kana Shōbō genzō - which may be taken as evidence that he would have delivered them in Chinese in his verbal teaching. But there is no hard evidence to prove this. 274-275

A later source, dating 1382, however, shows that Japanese monks with knowledge of spoken Chinese from their travels to the Yuan empire used it in their formal lectures. Again, the source also shows that such teaching was not understood by the larger part of the assembly. 275

In general, it can be said that monasteries tried to emulate the Chinese model of ritual life as far as possible, even if this meant that many monks would not understand what was being said.

- source : pmjs listserve -


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::



Tamamura Kozaburo (1856-1923?) - 1883-1900.


. Japanese priests - Introduction .

. Famous Buddhist Priests - ABC-List .


. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- - #speakingchinese -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2018/05/08

Jichi, Jitchi Juji Bosatsu

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Jichi Bosatsu 十地菩薩 Juji - 10 stages of a Bodhisattva
十地菩薩誓 / 菩薩の十地



- quote
十地(じっち、じゅうじ)は、
菩薩が修行して得られる菩薩五十二位の中、下位から数えて第41番目から第50番目の位をいう。十廻向の上位であり等覚より下位にあたる。上位から法雲・善想・不動・遠行・現前・難勝・焔光・発光・離垢・歓喜の10位がある。

仏智を生成し、よく住持して動かず、あらゆる衆生を荷負し教化利益する様子が、大地が万物を載せ、これを潤益(にょうやく)することに似ているから「地」と名づく。

法雲地(ほううんじ)
智慧波羅蜜を成就して修惑を断じ、無辺の功徳を具足して無辺の功徳水を出生して虚空を大雲で覆い清浄の衆水を出だすためにいう。平等の原理と差別の人間とが一体となった、平等即差別、差別即平等の真如の世界。

善想地(ぜんそうじ)
力波羅蜜を成就して修惑を断じ、十力を具足し一切処において可度不可度を知り、よく説法する位。一切の修行を完成した大慈大悲の菩薩が、真理の世界から具体的な事実の世界に働きかけ個々差別の衆生を救済する。

不動地(ふどうじ)
願波羅蜜を成就して修惑を断じ、無相観を作(な)し、任運無功用に相続する位。大慈大悲の心を起す。

遠行地(おんぎょうじ)
方便波羅蜜を成就して修惑を断じ、大慈悲心を発し二乗の自度を遠離する位。十十無尽の境地に入る。この位は第二阿僧祇劫の行を終えたとする。

現前地(げんぜんじ)
智慧波羅蜜を成就して修惑を断じ、最勝智慧を発し染浄の差別なきを現前せしめる位。不退転の位で決して後戻りせず、必ず仏になる確信を得る。

難勝地(なんしょうじ)
極難勝地ともいい、禅定波羅蜜を成就して修惑を断じ、真俗二智の行相互いに違異なるを和合せしめる位。四諦の法門の外に大乗の法門を学び、利他行に取り組む。

焔光地(えんこうじ)
焔慧地ともいい、精進波羅蜜を成就して修惑を断じ、智慧を熾盛に光らしめる位。個々の物に対する執着心を離れ、その功徳として四方を照らす。

発光地(はっこうじ)
忍辱波羅蜜を成就して修惑を断じ、諦察法忍を得て智慧を顕発する位。精進の結果、その功徳として光を放ち十種の法明門を行う。

離垢地(りくじ)
戒波羅蜜を成就して修惑を断じ、毀犯の垢を除き清浄ならしめる位。十の善を行い、心の垢を離れる。

歓喜地(かんぎじ)
菩薩が既に初阿僧祇劫の行を満足して、聖性を得て見惑を破し、二空の理を証し大いに歓喜する位。仏法を信じ、一切衆生を救済しようとの立願を起こし、ついには自らも仏になるという希望を持ち歓んで修行する。
- source : wikipedia

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

- quote -
Juji - In Japanese, the ten stages are:
1) kangiji (the stage of joy in benefiting oneself and others)
2) rikuji (the stage of freedom from all defilement)
3) hakkoji (the stage of emmitting the light of wisdom)
4) enneji (the stage of radiating wisdom)
5) nanshoji (the stage at which one is difficult to conquer)
6) genzenji (the stage at which reality is manifested before one's eyes)
7) ongyoji (the stage of going far)
8) fudoji (the stage of being immovable)
9) zenneji (the stage of attaining expedient wisdom)
10 hounji (the stage when one can spread the Dharma, like a cloud)


- source : Helen Josephine Baroni -



The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Zen Buddhism

Helen Josephine Baroni

Over 1,700 alphabetically-arranged entries cover the beliefs, practices, significant movements, organizations, and personalities associated with Zen Buddhism.


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


. Roku Jizō 六地蔵 Roku Jizo, Six Jizo Statues .
Chiji Jizō 地持地蔵
and in a different naming:
Jizoo Bosatsu, Hooshuu Bosatsu, Hoosho Bosatsu, Hooinshu Bosatsu, Jichi Bosatsu und Kengoi Bosatsu.


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. O-Mamori お守り Amulets and Talismans .


. Fudō Myō-ō, Fudoo Myoo-Oo 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O
Acala Vidyârâja - Vidyaraja - Fudo Myoo .


. 薬師如来 Yakushi Nyorai 薬師如来 Bhaisajyaguru - ABC .


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. Pilgrimages to Fudo Temples 不動明王巡礼
Fudo Myo-O Junrei - Fudo Pilgrims - INTRODUCTION .



. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- - #jichibosatsu #jichi -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2018/05/06

Kyoto San Kobo Daishi

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Kyoto San Kobo 京都三弘法 Three Temples with Kobo Daishi



- quote -
The three most important temples related to Kobo Daishi
Getting the stamp of all three brings extra go-riyaku virtues.

東寺 To-Ji
仁和寺 Ninna-Ji
神光院 Jinko-In
.
弘法大師空海ゆかりの3ヶ寺を巡拝する三弘法まいりの風習は、江戸時代中期にはじまったとされ、正月の3日間にお参りすれば一年中の厄を逃れられるとされています。 また毎月21日の弘法大師の縁日に巡礼する習わしもあります。
さらに、
四国八十八ヶ所霊場を巡るお遍路が、道中安全を祈願して3ヶ寺で菅笠・金剛杖・納札箱を授かり、それらを身につけて巡礼する風習もありました。
三弘法まいり
の風習は昭和30年代頃にいったん廃れましたが、平成24年(2012)に「京都三弘法霊場会」が結成され、半世紀ぶりに復活しました。
- source : kyonoreijo.sakura.ne.jp...








納め札箱 - 金剛杖 - 菅笠のミニチュア
Miniatures of the bag for fuda, the staff and a special Henro straw hat
弘法三


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. Pilgrimages to Fudo Temples 不動明王巡礼
Fudo Myo-O Junrei - Fudo Pilgrims - INTRODUCTION .



. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- - #kyotosankobo #kobodaishikyoto -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2018/05/04

Keisokuji Temples

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. - - - - - ABC-List of the Sennin Immortals Hermits - - - - - .
. sennin 仙人と伝説 Legends about Immortals .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Keisokuji 鶏足寺 Keisoku-Ji Temple of the chicken legs

There are at least three temples with this name, each with a different legend about the naming.


..............................................................................................................................................


................................................................................. Hyogo 兵庫県 

鶏足寺 Keisoku-Ji



The temple was once located on mount 峰相山 Mineaiyama (244m) in the North-West of Himeji.
The temple was founded in 1348. Its history is written down in the records of Mineai-Ki 峯相記.
In 1348 a mendicant priest came here, heard the story from the old head priest of the temple and wrote it down.
It relates to Empress Jingu Kogo 神功皇后 and a prince from 新羅 Shinra (Shiragi), Korea, who wanted to promote Buddhism in Japan and founded the temple.

同書によれば、神功皇后が三韓征伐の際に連れてきた新羅の王子が草庵を建立したのが当寺の始まりで、その王子は3世紀ほど後の敏達天皇10年(581年)に没したという。
伝承によれば、「皇后が新羅の王子を連れ帰ることにした。王子は皇后に渡海を無事に終えて日域(日本のこと)に着けば、伽藍を建てたいと願い出たが、仏法の是非のわからない皇后は明答しなかった。皇后は帰国後、西域の不安に備えて副将軍の男貴尊を播磨にとどめおき、王子を預けた。その後、王子は、峯相山に草庵をつくって、千手陀羅尼を唱えた」とある。
鶏足寺には空也や書写山圓教寺の開山・性空も来山したと伝わる。『峯相記』が書かれた1348年頃には寺勢はすでに往古にくらべて衰退していたという。
天正6年(1578年)、中国攻めの羽柴秀吉に抵抗したため、全山焼き討ちにあい滅亡し、廃寺となった。
- reference source : wikipedia -


. shinkei 神鶏 sacred rooster .
- Nagata Shrine Kobe 長田神社  神戸 and Empress Jingu Kogo 神功皇后

According to the Nihon Shoki history, Nagata Shrine was founded by Empress Jingu Kogo 神功皇后 at the beginning of the 3rd century, when she came back from her war with Korea and was on her way to Kyoto.
Her boat suddenly came to a halt near the estuary of Buko river, now near Kobe port 武庫の水門 (Buko no suimon). When she prayed for an answer to this event, the deity appeared to her and asked to be venerated in this region. This happened through the oracle of the rooster, which sounded like the voice of the deity

鶏鳴の聞こゆる里は、吾が有縁の地なり
The place where the voice of the rooster is heard
shall be my home.




................................................................................. Shiga 滋賀県 

Keisokuji 鶏足寺 Temple Keisoku-Ji "Temple dedicated to the legs of a chicken"
Chicken Foot Temple.

This temple dates back to the Nara period. It is located in the North of Lake Biwako, on Mount 己高山 Kodakamiyama (923 m).
Priest Gyoki Bosatsu had build the temple Todai-Ji in Nara.
And then came the priest Taicho and founded the temple 飯福寺 Hanpuku-Ji in the direction to protect Todai-Ji from evil influence (kimon 鬼門).

The main statue of this temple is 十一面観音 Juichimen Kannon with 11 heads. It was placed in a temple named 観音寺 Kannon-Ji, founded by Gyoki in 735).
Next there was priest Saicho, founder of Mount Hieizan. He traveled in the footsteps of Gyoki for a while and came to this temple.
On his way he heard the voice of a bird (rooster - kei) and saw footprints (soku) of the animal.
He followed the footprints and found a run-down temple with a statue of Kannon. Now the name of the temple was changed to
Keisoku-Ji.
It seems the original temple was on top of the mountain, but Keisoku-Ji is now at the food of Mount Kodakamiyama.
The old temple building was lost to fire in 1933.
In the area is also the Shinto shrine 与志漏神社 Yoshiro Jinja with a 薬師堂 Yakushi-Do Hall.



Now the temple is famous for the red autumn leaves.

- quote -
The temple was closed and abandoned after the end of Edo Period, however it’s been managed and maintained by local residents, and it’s now one of most important cultural properties and popular tourist attractions in the prefecture.
- source and photos : jw-webmagazine.com/keisoku-ji... -

滋賀県長浜市 Shiga Nagahama


. Taichoo, Taichō 泰澄上人 Saint Taicho Shonin .
and a legend from Shiga

. Gyooki Bosatsu 行基菩薩 Gyoki Bosatsu (668 - 749).

. Saicho, Dengyo Daishi 伝教大師最澄 (766 - 822) .





................................................................................. Tochigi 栃木県 


鶏足寺 Keisokuk-Ji "Temple dedicated to the legs of a hen"
本尊:七仏薬師 Shichibutsu Yakushi
足利市小俣町2748-1 // 2748 Omatachō, Ashikaga-shi, Tochigi

. Shichibutsu Yakushi 七仏薬師 / 七佛薬師 Seven Yakushi Statues .


source : .city.ashikaga.tochigi.jp/site/bunkazai...

The statue is 52 cm high. End of Heian or beginning of Kamakura period.
In the compound of Keisoku-Ji was a hall dedicated to the Buddha of Medicine, 医王堂本堂.

- quote -
Keisokuji Temple
Over 1,100 years ago, this temple was opened by Joe Shonin (a Buddhist priest of Todaiji Temple in Nara Pref.).
At first,
the name was Sesonji Temple (Shakyamuni Temple). During the Tengyo-no-Ran (Tengyo War) (939-940), Hidesato Fujiwara (the head of a powerful family of the Heian period) overthrew Masakado Taira (a general of the Heian period) using a curse and the emperor gave this temple the name Keisokuji.

- - - - - The legend of Keisokuji Temple
In 939, Masakado Taira( a general of the Heian period) started the war that betrayed the Imperial Court.
During the next year, Hidesato Fujiwara fought with Masakado, obeying the emperor's instructions.
At this time, the highest Buddhist priest of the Sesonji Temple prayed for Hidesato's victory. Using Buddha's teaching, he offered the neck of Masakado which was made of clay. He kept praying every day and every night.
Finally on the eighth day, he fell asleep.
In his dream, he found a hen who had three legs treading on Masakado's bloody neck.
When he awoke to the hen's laughing voice, he saw Masakado's clay neck had three footprints clearly stamped in it.
In the 17th day of the full moon, Hidesato beat Masakado.
The name of Sesonji Temple has thus changed to Keisokuji Temple.
- source : japanguides.net/tochigi...-

. Yakushi Nyorai 薬師如来 - Legends .


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


. sennin 仙人と伝説 Legends about Immortals .


. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- - #keisokuji -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2018/04/18

Tachidaruma statue Gifu Tounji

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Tachidaruma, Tachi-Daruma 立達磨 / 立ち達磨 Standing Daruma Statue



This is the largest Daruma statue in Japan!
It is in Hida, Gifu 岐阜県飛騨市(旧吉城郡神岡町) and 16,5 m high.
It was made in 1973 in July.

The mountain belongs to the temple 曹洞宗補陀山洞雲寺 Toun-Ji of the Soto Zen Sect.
It was founded around 1400 and became the family temple of the 江馬氏 Ema clan around 1600.
The temple is better knows as だるま堂 Daruma-Do Hall.
There is a huge collection of Daruma artifacts in the hall, now attracting many visitors.




- quote
立ち達磨(たちだるま)は、岐阜県飛騨市(旧吉城郡神岡町)にある達磨像である。立ち達磨とは、達磨大師の立たれた姿である(一般には達磨は座禅した姿が多い)。 観音山の中腹に鎮座しており、同山の麓にある曹洞宗補陀山洞雲寺の所有となる。 発願主の筆頭は同寺の先々代住職大森雅道老師 通称『日本一の立ち達磨』
「町のシンボルにしよう」と達磨像の話が持ち上がった。 達磨大師は曹洞宗の原点の一つだが、別のきっかけもあった。 浩潤球学(1877-1953)という高僧である。俗姓を丘といい、丘球学としても知られる。球学老師は明治27年に洞雲寺二十世住職となった大潤(丘)宗潭に随侍していた。宗潭老師は伊豆の修禅寺住職となり、のちに永平寺副貫首も務める。 球学老師はよく洞雲寺にきて、町の住民に戒を授ける「授戒会」で「戒師」を務め、昭和28年に遷化されたが、住民たちは今も「球学さん」と、よくその名を覚えている。  その球学老師は、よく筆を執り、数多くの絵や書を神岡の人々に手渡したという。絵では観音様の次に達磨太子の絵が多く、そのことを町の人たちは思い出し、達磨像にしようという話になった。  またこの立ち達磨をきっかけに、昭和59年に全日本だるま研究会初代会長・今泉實平氏が三千点に及ぶ達磨コレクションの寄進を申し出た。すると建物は寄進を申し出る人もいた。これにより洞雲寺内に「達磨堂」が完成。展示を行っている。  昭和30年一月、江戸木遣りが神岡に伝授された記念に、町の人々が行列を組み、横2m、縦1mの額を同寺の金毘羅堂に奉納。以降、「初金毘羅」は盛大になり、達磨市が出て達磨供養も行われるようになった。
-
高さ8.9mの銅製の立達磨像。台座を含めると16.5mに及ぶ。
使用した銅約8tは、三井金属鉱業神岡鉱山から産出された銅鉱を使用。
1973年(昭和48年)6月3日建立。
「だるま」は禅宗の「初祖」として崇敬されている菩提達磨が壁に向かって九年の座禅を行ったことによって手足が腐ってしまったという伝説がある。ここから、手足のない形状で置物が作られるようになり、丸みを帯びた「だるま」が一般的となった。「立ち達磨」は菩提達磨が立位した銅像で、日本一の大きさを誇り、極めて珍しい。
- source : wikipedia

.......................................................................




Tachidaruma loves the Statue of Liberty

TLSTプロジェクト(Tachidaruma Loves the Statue of Liberty)
立ちだるま、NYへ熱視線
- reference source : sotoday.fun -

- see more photos online -




::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

There is another temple named Toun-Ji in Shirakawa, Gifu.

洞雲寺(とううんじ)は、岐阜県加茂郡白川町にある曹洞宗の寺院。山号は大龍山

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. Daruma Museum Japan - Darumapedia .


. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- - #gifudaruma #tachidaruma #tounji -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2018/04/14

Sennin 16 Saga no In Kunshi

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. - - - - - ABC-List of the Sennin Immortals Hermits - - - - - .
. sennin 仙人と伝説 Legends about Immortals .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Saga no In Kunshi 嵯峨の隠君子 / 嵯峨隠君子

He is Nr. 16 of the
. 日本の仏仙人16人 - The 16 Buddhist Immortals of Japan .

He was 嵯峨天皇の隠君子 the son of Emperor Saga Tenno.
He entered priesthood as a child before becoming an adult. As he grew older, his hair grew white while he kept his childlike figure.

Not much is known about him.

He lived during the time of Sugawara no Michizane (845 - 903) - Butsusen Nr. 15.
He lived as a hermit in 西山 Nishiyama. (Or maybe in 南山 Nanzan).
He liked to play the 琴 Koto.
He also got along well with the local Onigami Kishin 鬼神 Demon Deity.

老君子 / 隠れ若子

. Emperor Saga 嵯峨天皇 (786 – 842) .
Saga was a scholar of the Chinese classics. He was also a renowned as a skillful calligrapher.
According to legend, he was the first Japanese emperor to drink tea.

..............................................................................................................................................


南山白頭翁 Nanzan Hakuto Okina
Old man with white hair from Mount Nanzan

He was 98 years old and still had full white hair, a face fresh like a peach.
Nanzan is another name for 吉野山 Yoshinoyama.
The old man lived in a small hut, he was not a farmer nor a merchant.
He only had a desk and a bamboo basket.
He had no money and no food provisions.


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. sennin 天狗と仙人伝説 Legends about Tengu and Immortals .

. sennin 仙人と伝説 Legends about Immortals .


. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- - #saganoinkunshi #inkunshi #kunshi -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Sennin 14 Miyako no Yoshika

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. - - - - - ABC-List of the Sennin Immortals Hermits - - - - - .
. sennin 仙人と伝説 Legends about Immortals .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Miyako no Yoshika 都良香
(834 - 879)

He is Nr. 14 of the
. 日本の仏仙人16人 - The 16 Buddhist Immortals of Japan .


- source : wikimedia / painting by Kikuchi Yōsai 菊池容斎

Miyako no Yoshika (都良香) was a poet and scholar of the Heian Period and had an office at the court.
His speciality was kangaku 漢学 Chinese learning.
Legends say that 100 years after he left office, he was spotted on a mountain as a hermit, his face unchanged.


When Miyako no Yoshika passed through the Rashomon Gate in Kyoto, he composed the beginning of a new poem:
氣霽風梳新柳髪
From the roof of the gate there was a voice continuing with the second part of the poem:
氷消波洗旧苔鬚
This must have been the voice of the Demon of Rashomon Gate.

. Rashomon Gate 羅生門 - Introduction .
羅城門の鬼、羅生門の鬼 // The Demon of Rashomon

. Sugawara no Michizane 菅原道真 (845 - 903).

A similar tale is known when he traveled to 竹生島 Chikubu Island in Lake Biwako.
There it was 弁才天 the Deity Benten who provided the second part to his poem.

Although their life dates are different, there are tales about Yoshika and Sugawara no Michizane.
They were shooting arrows at the estate of Miyako.



- source : 国文学研究資料館

..............................................................................................................................................


- quote -
Miyako no Yoshika was a scholar and statesman of the Heian court.
Today, he is most famous for having written up the earliest convincing account of Mt Fuji’s crater. This appears in an essay entitled A Record of Mt Fuji.
Unfortunately, history doesn’t relate whether he saw the crater for himself, or heard about it from somebody else.
- snip snip -
On the face of it, the ninth century would have been a bad time to make the attempt. Three huge eruptions wracked Mt Fuji between 800 and 865, the last one so extravagantly effusive that it created a new lake at the mountain’s foot. Yoshika’s own account of the volcano describes how a new parasite cone suddenly appeared in March 803.
Even if he wasn’t put off by these fulminations,
Yoshika had a lot of business to keep him in Kyoto. He was a lesser private secretary (shō-naiki) in the administration, and a professor of literature too. In 870, he set the civil service entrance examination for Sugawara no Michizane, who later became the greatest scholar-statesman of the age.
Intriguingly,
the exam’s second question required Sugawara to “Analyse earthquakes” – elucidating why the normally still earth moved, how the Chinese explained the phenomenon, and how the Buddhists in India explained it. Michizane first presented the Confucian view – that the earth heaved when the emperor’s virtue was inadequate and the government was in disarray – and then added a Taoist interpretation of earthquakes for good measure.
Reading this story, I was momentarily enthused. Perhaps Miyako no Yoshika was a would-be geophysicist, born a thousand years before his time. If so, he would naturally have wanted to climb Mt Fuji, taking samples of the ash and meticulously recording the still-steaming lava streams as he went…
Alas,
a re-reading of Yoshika’s Record of Mt Fuji disabused me. The essay doesn’t support the idea that Yoshika was a proto-scientist. Indeed, it’s clear that the author’s real concerns lay elsewhere than the crater; which is described more or less as an afterthought. What really fascinated Yoshika were the supernatural “Immortals” said to inhabit the upper slopes, or the angels who were seen dancing in the clouds over the summit.
For Yoshika,
it seems, there was no dividing line between the “natural” and “supernatural”. In Heian times, nature and super-nature were larger and more mysterious than humans could possibly imagine. A quaintly outmoded way of thinking, one might have thought – at least, until last year, when those waves crashed ashore that were higher than anybody could possibly have imagined.
So perhaps Yoshika didn’t climb Mt Fuji after all.
Yet there is still something appealing in the idea of him hanging up his court robes on the back of his office door – perhaps after a stressful day examining the impossibly precocious Sugawara – sneaking out of the Palace incognito, and then hopping aboard the evening Shinkansen to Shizuoka for a quick run up Mt Fuji...
- source : onehundredmountains.blogspot.jp... -

Fujisan ki 富士山記 A Record of Mt Fuji


..............................................................................................................................................


- quote -
都 良香(みやこ の よしか)  (承和元年(834年) - 元慶3年2月25日(879年3月21日))
は、平安時代前期の貴族・文人。姓は宿禰のち朝臣。初名は言道。主計頭・都貞継の子。官位は従五位下・文章博士。
----- 経歴
----- 人物
----- 官歴
----- 説話
漢詩にまつわる説話が複数伝えられており、後世においても、漢詩人として評価されていたことが窺われる。
-- ある人が羅城門を通った時に、良香の詠んだ漢詩を誦したところ、門の鬼が詩句に感心したという(『江談抄』『本朝神仙伝』)。
-- 良香が晩夏に竹生島に遊んだ際に作ったという「三千世界は眼前に尽き。十二因縁は心裏に空し。」の下の句は竹生島の主である弁才天が良香に教えたものであるという(『江談抄』)。
また、
活躍時期がやや異なるにもかかわらず、良香と菅原道真が一緒に登場する説話・逸話が見られる。
-- 良香の家で門下生が弓遊びをしていた際、普段勉学に追われていることから、とうていうまく射ることはできないであろうと道真に弓を射させてみたところ、百発百中の勢いであった。良香はこれは対策及第の兆候であると予言し、実際に道真は及第したという(『北野天神縁起』)。
-- 菅原道真に昇進で先を越されたことから、良香は怒って官職を辞し、大峯山に入って消息を絶った。100年ほど後、ある人が山にある洞窟で良香に会ったところ、容貌は昔のままで、まるで壮年のようであったという(『本朝神仙伝』)。
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !


- source - 太宰府天満宮・宝物館 - 『北野天神縁起』
Yoshika and Michizane shooting arrows


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


Who was the first to climb Mount Fuji ?



- quote -
富士山・富士登山者昔むかし - Who was the first to climb Mount Fuji ?
富士山に最初に登ったのは木花開耶姫だという。2番は中国秦の徐福(前330年)。3番めはあの大和武尊(西暦110年?)と伝えます。
4、聖徳太子(598年頃)。5、役の行者(680年頃)。6、都良香が取材した人(898年以前)。7、僧末代(1149年頃)…私はいったい何千万人めにあたるのでしょうか。
・山梨県と静岡県との境

【本文】
いまではすっかり観光地化され、ゴミの山イメージになってしまった富士山。清掃登山も盛んに行われるようになってきましたが、「山ヤ」さんの間では、冬以外もはや登山の対象ではなくなています。

しかし遠く北アルプス白馬(しろうま)岳、北陸白山、和歌山県の山からも望めるその姿は、やはり気になります。富士山に最初に登ったのは誰でしょうか。

①:最初に登ったのは木花咲耶姫(このはなさくやひめ)。Konohahasakuya Hime
縄文時代、いまから3000年前の新富士山形成時から紀元前400年前後までの間に「永遠の命を天に求めるため登った」という。『古事記』や『日本書紀』などに記載されている伝説の中ながら、この神は神武天皇(紀元前711年生まれということになっている)の曽祖母にあたるというから古い話です。

②:中国の仙術士除福(じょふく)。The Chinese Sennin Jofuku
秦始皇帝の命令で不老長生回春の薬草を探しに登ったという。中国945~954年ころ、僧義楚が編纂した『義楚六帖』(きそろくじょう)という本には除福、富士山に漂着し、その子孫は「秦」と称していまに至るとあります。330年ころと伝えます。

③:弥生時代、西暦150年代?日本武尊(やまとたけるのみこと)Yamato Takeru
が東征のおり登頂したと伝えます。

④:あの聖徳太子。Shotoku Taishi
598年ころ(17歳の時)、甲斐の国より献上された黒駒に乗り、空を飛んで富士山に登ったと「聖徳太子伝暦」などに記載がある。

(5):次は役ノ行者。En no Gyoja
奈良の葛城山で一言主神の讒言により伊豆の大島に流された行者は、昼間は勅命に従って島の内にいておとなしくしていたが、夜になると富士の山に登って修行したと『日本霊異記』(平安初期・僧景戒著)にあります。680年ころ。

⑥:桓武(かんむ)天皇 Kanmu Tenno (800年頃・平安時代初期)。

⑦:空海(807年ころ)。Kukai

⑧:平安初期の漢学者の都良香(みやこのよしか)Miyako no Yoshika
が会った登山者。良香は富士山に登った人から聞いて「富士山記」(879年)のなかで、噴火口の沸騰池、虎岩など見た者でしか分からない細かい描写をしています。
Yoshika heard the details from someone who had climbed Mount Fuji, when he wrote his report in 879. It seems he did not climb the mountain himself.

⑨:平安後期の末代(まつだい)法師。Matsudai Hoshi
久安年中(1145~1151)に山頂奥宮の位置に大日寺を建立。⑩:鎌倉時代に入ると、猪之頭の民が源頼朝の「巻狩り」の時に、山頂の雪を献上した記録があります。

続いて親鸞上人が、また日蓮上人が登り経ヶ岳に経を埋め、1518年には、暴風で13人の道者が遭難した記録もあります。江戸時代に入ろうとする1600年ころになると、128回登山の記録を持つ藤原角行が富士講を開き、以後、講を組んで「六根清浄」と唱えながらの富士登山が隆盛をむかえます。……私はいったい何千万人めの登山者にあたるのでしょうか。

- more
- reference source : toki.moo.jp/gaten...200... -


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

................................................................................. Kyoto 京都市 

kishi 鬼詞 the demon's poem
When Miyako no Yoshika passed through the Rashomon Gate in Kyoto, he composed the beginning of a new poem. From the roof of the gate there was a voice continuing with the second part of the poem.
When 菅原道真 Sugawara no Michizane heard this story, he said it must have been the Demon of Rashomon who composed this part of the poem.


..............................................................................................................................................

- reference : Nichibun Yokai Database -

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. sennin 天狗と仙人伝説 Legends about Tengu and Immortals .

. sennin 仙人と伝説 Legends about Immortals .


. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- - #miyakonoyoshika #yoshikasennin -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2018/04/13

Sennin 13 Ikoma

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. - - - - - ABC-List of the Sennin Immortals Hermits - - - - - .
. sennin 仙人と伝説 Legends about Immortals .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Ikoma Sennin 生馬仙人 / 生馬仙 Ikoma Sen

He is Nr. 13 of the
. 日本の仏仙人16人 - The 16 Buddhist Immortals of Japan .




- source 絵本故事談 (山本序周:作、橘有税[橘守国])



- source 本朝列仙伝 (田中玄順) Priest Myotatsu and five gourds


- reference source : 国文学研究資料館 -

..............................................................................................................................................

He comes from Osaka, 摂津住吉 Settsu Sumiyoshi and practised religious austerities at 高安山 Mount Takayasuyama (488 m).
In 897 僧明達 the priest Myotatsu came to the mountain and in a cave saw a man sitting, wearing a white hat and white robes.
The man was alomost starving, so Myotatsu gave him five uri 瓜 gourds.
Asked for his name he replied
我は是れ生馬の仙人 "I am the Sennin from Ikoma!"
After entering the mountain this Immortal had never come back down to the valley

..............................................................................................................................................



- quote -
Mount Ikoma (生駒山 Ikoma-yama)
is a mountain on the border of Nara Prefecture and Osaka Prefecture in Japan. It is the highest peak in the Ikoma Mountains with a height of 642 meters.
Mount Ikoma
is a part of Kongō-Ikoma-Kisen Quasi-National Park. It is one of the most famous picnic spots in the Kansai region. On the top of the mountain, there are many TV towers for broadcasting to the Kansai region and Ikoma Sanjo Amusement Park.
Mount Ikoma
was an important object of worship for ancient Japanese people. On the east foot of the mountain, Ikoma Jinja (literally 'Shrine for Mount Ikoma') has been extant since the 5th century. The mountain and the Hozan-ji temple near the summit were traditionally celebrated as national scenery and included in well-known woodblock series such as the "Sixty-eight National Views."
- source : wikipedia ... -


- Pilgrimage to 18 Shingon Temples in Kansai-
No. 13 . Hōzan-ji 宝山寺 / 寳山寺 Hozan-Ji .
奈良県生駒市門前町1-1 - 1-1 Monzenchō, Ikoma-shi, Nara
This temple is officially located in Nara, but many people from Osaka come here to pray and enjoy the vista too.


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. sennin 天狗と仙人伝説 Legends about Tengu and Immortals .

. sennin 仙人と伝説 Legends about Immortals .


. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- - #senninikoma #ikomasennin #myotatsu -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Sennin 11 Sadazumi Shinno

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. - - - - - ABC-List of the Sennin Immortals Hermits - - - - - .
. sennin 仙人と伝説 Legends about Immortals .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Sadazumi Shinno 貞純親王 Prince Sadazumi-Shinno
(873 – 916)

He is Nr. 11 of the
. 日本の仏仙人16人 - The 16 Buddhist Immortals of Japan .



He was the sixth son of the emperor Seiwa.
His line has produced the three Shogun families of Minamoto, Ashikaga, and Tokugawa.
Descendants of the Minamoto clan worship Sadazumi Shinno as their tutelary deity.
He had ordered 13000 Buddha statues to be placed in the temples of Japan.

Legends tells of him one day when he turned 44 he went to 一条大宮の桃園池 the Peach Park Pond at Ichijo Omiya and became a huge dragon.
From then on he was also called 桃園親王 Prince from the Peach Park.

- quote -
The Seiwa Genji (清和源氏)
is a line of the Japanese Minamoto clan that is descended from Emperor Seiwa, which is the most successful and powerful line of the clan. Many of the most famous Minamoto warriors, including Minamoto no Yoshiie, Minamoto no Yoritomo, the founder of the Kamakura shogunate; and Ashikaga Takauji, the founder of the Ashikaga shogunate, belonged to this line. Tokugawa Ieyasu (1543–1616), founder of the Tokugawa shogunate, also claimed descent from this lineage. The family is named after Emperor Seiwa, who was the grandfather of Minamoto no Tsunemoto who founded the Seiwa Genji.
Emperor Seiwa was father of Imperial Prince Sadazumi (貞純親王 Sadazumi Shinnō) (873–916),
who was in turn the father of Minamoto no Tsunemoto (源経基) (894–961), founder of the Seiwa Genji, from whom the Seiwa Genji descended.
Many samurai families belong to this line and used "Minamoto" clan name in official records, including the Ashikaga clan, Hatakeyama clan, Hosokawa clan, Imagawa clan, Mori, Nanbu clan, Nitta clan, Ogasawara clan, Ōta clan, Satake clan, Satomi clan, Shiba clan, Takeda clan, Toki clan, Tsuchiya clan, among others. The Shimazu clan served the Tsuchiya clan loyally for many years.
The Shimazu and Tokugawa clans also claimed to belong to this line.

- - - Sasarindo 笹竜胆 family crest - - -
A group of Shinto shrines connected closely with the clan is known as
the Three Genji Shrines (源氏三神社 Genji San Jinja).
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

平安時代前期-中期,清和天皇の皇子。
母は棟貞王(むねさだおう)の娘。貞観(じょうがん)15年親王となる。中務(なかつかさ)卿,兵部(ひょうぶ)卿,上総(かずさ)・常陸(ひたち)・上野(こうずけ)の太守をつとめた。清和源氏の祖である源経基(つねもと)の父とされる。延喜(えんぎ)16年5月7日死去。
貞純親王(さだずみしんのう)は、日本の平安時代前期の皇族。清和天皇の第六皇子。母は棟貞王の娘。王子に経基王・経生王がある。桃園親王と号す。
親王任国とされる上総や常陸の太守や、中務卿・兵部卿を歴任したが、位階は四品に留まった。経基・経生の両王子が共に源姓を賜与され臣籍降下したことから、清和源氏の祖の一人となった。ただし、これについては異説があり、従来の貞純親王流とされる清和源氏は陽成天皇(親王の兄)からつながる血筋だとする説もある。また、出生年月日は貞観12年(870年)3月10日[1]、貞観16年(874年)3月23日[2]とも。
いわゆる清和源氏の出自について異説があるが、その一つに陽成源氏説がある。これは、清和源氏の祖とされた経基王が陽成天皇の皇子・元平親王の皇子ではないかとする説である。これは明治の歴史学者星野恒の唱えたもので、明治30年代に石清水八幡宮祠官田中家文書の中に源頼信が応神天皇陵に納めたとされる永承元年(1046年)告文に「先人新発其先経基其先元平親王其先陽成天皇其先清和天皇」と明記してある事を根拠としたもの。しかしこの文書は写本であり、告文の裏面に校正したと但書きがあることから信憑性が疑われている。また、告文の内容は河内石川庄の相続順序に過ぎないとする説や、12世紀はじめに書かれた「大鏡」が武家源氏を清和天皇の末としていることもあり、清和源氏が正しいとする学者が多くいる。
- reference source : wikipedia -

.......................................................................

Sadazumi Shinno, the fifth son of the Emperor Seiwa, passed the greater part of his life as a priest at the temple Amadera (Ama-dera) in Kyoto
- writes Lafcadio Hearn.

Daitsuuji 大通寺 Daitsu-Ji ; 【通称名称】: 尼寺(あまでら)Amadera Nunnery
Founded by the widow of Minamoto no Sanetomo in 1222.

- quote -
大通寺(尼寺) Daitsu-Ji Amadera
源実朝の夫人・本覚尼が夫の菩提を弔うために建立。北条政子も寺領を寄進し、足利氏も源氏ゆかりの寺として保護につとめ、豊臣、徳川氏もこれらにならったという。現在、本堂に本尊宝冠釈迦如来座像と、脇壇に源実朝像を安置する。門内右の五輪石塔は‘十六夜日記’の作者、阿仏尼の墓と伝える。(一般非公開)
建立:1222年頃(鎌倉時代)

南区大宮通九条下ル西九条比永城町1 / Nishikujo Hieijocho, Minami Ward, Kyoto
- reference source : kanko.city.kyoto.lg.jp/detail... -

..............................................................................................................................................

Genji San Jinja 源氏三神社 Three most important Genji Shrines

六孫王神社(京都府京都市南区)Rokusonno Jinja, Kyoto

多田神社(兵庫県川西市多田)Tada Jinja, Hyogo

壺井八幡宮(大阪府羽曳野市壺井)Tsuboi Hachimangu, Osaka

- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. sennin 天狗と仙人伝説 Legends about Tengu and Immortals .

. sennin 仙人と伝説 Legends about Immortals .


. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- - #SadazumiShinno #sadazumi #minamoto #butsusen -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2018/04/12

Sennin 08 Kan Shiwa Kanshiwa

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. - - - - - ABC-List of the Sennin Immortals Hermits - - - - - .
. sennin 仙人と伝説 Legends about Immortals .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Kan Shiwa 韓志和
飛龍士韓志和 Hiryushi  Kan Shiwa


He is Nr.08 of the
. 日本の仏仙人16人 - The 16 Buddhist Immortals of Japan .


source : panoramahida.iza-yoi.net/hidatakumi...

Most probably he was a master carpenter of Hida Takayama. The statue shows him with a chisel and hammer.
He could carve a crane and make it fly around, or carve a cat and it would catch mice.
. Hida no takumi 飛騨の匠 expert carpenter or craftsman from Hida .
They were already well known in the Heian period.

Later he was 飛龍隊の兵士 in the Imperial guard of "the flying dragons" in China.

- quote -
“…’Golden Butterflies’ is about a Japanese immigrant living in the T’ang dynasty China (619-905), probably one of the many Japanese students and pilgrims who went to China during the early T’ang to learn Chinese arts and sciences for their own newly developing nation of Yamato (Japan).
The name of this particular individual, Han Shih-ho (Han Shiho, or in Japanese, Kan Shiwa) would seem to indicate that he was in fact of fairly recent Chinese or Korean ancestry, as were many families among the upper classes of ancient Japan and in the craft guilds they patronized. Kan Shiwa was a master craftsman, one of the professional pursuits traditionally associated with Taoism.
Although stories about him mention no details on this point, he was evidently also a martial artist, another profession with traditional Taoist connections, for he served in the imperial guard of the ruling house of the T’ang. His story illustrates a number of Taoist ideas. His ability to make lifelike moving replicas of insects, animals, and birds represents what is sometimes called taking over creation, the power to infuse inert matter (the physical body) with vitality, energy, and spirit. The relationship between the color of his mechanical insects and the 'food' he gives them illustrates the way personality is formed by education and environmental influences.
The story of the golden butterflies represents the Taoist theory of 'equalizing things' in worldly terms, through redistribution of wealth by nonviolent means."
-from Vitality, Energy, Spirit: a Taoist Sourcebook // translated and edited by Thomas Cleary (p.37-38)


- quote -
GOLDEN BUTTERFLIES
"In the time of the emperor Mu-tsung (Muzong) of the T’ang dynasty, in the ninth century, among the members of the elite corps of the imperial guard was a Japanese man named Kan Shiwa.
Kan Shiwa
was a most extraordinary sculptor. He could fashion any sort of bird and make it so that it could drink water, hop around, stretch out its neck and call, and so on, all in the most beautiful and charming manner. He put machinery in the bellies of the birds he made, so that besides having beautiful plumage they could also fly one or two hundred feet in the air.
Also,
Shiwa sculpted cats that could do even more; they could run around and even catch small birds.
Now the captain of the guard thought this was truly marvelous, and wrote to the emperor about it. Emperor Mu-tsung summoned Kan Shiwa into his presence, and he too was captivated by Shiwa’s skill.
The emperor asked Shiwa
if he could carve something yet more marvelous. Shiwa told the emperor he would make a 'dais for seeing dragons.'
..... Not without misgivings, the emperor stepped up. The moment he did so, a gigantic dragon appeared in the sky. It was about twice the size of a man and had scales, a mane, claws, and horns; it flew into the clouds and rode on a mist, dancing in the sky. Its energy and appearance were such that one would never think it to have been made by human hands.
The emperor
was flabbergasted. Frantically he jumped off the little platform and said, 'Fine, fine, very good, now take it away with you!'
Strange to say, the moment he got off the dais the big dragon disappeared. All that remained was to put it back in its place.
Now Shiwa apologized to the emperor for startling him so, and offered to make good by doing something amusing. .....
- source : theparhelia.com/blog/2017... -


- quote -
..... Shiwa made some small things, "They are like spiders, they are flycatchers."
"Are they real?" the emperor asked, amazed by their lifelike quality.
"No, they are manmade," Shiwa answered. . . .
Catching the flies, one by one they returned to Shiwa's palm.
The emperor marveled at this. He gave Shiwa a big reward of silver, which Shiwa ungrudgingly gave away to poor people in the city. Now the rumor passed around among the people of the city was that Kan Shiwa was a spiritual immortal from the Isles of the Blest in the East Sea.
Just when this gossip reached its peak, Kan Shiwa disappeared from the imperial guard and no one ever saw him again.
- reference source : The Taoism Reader - Thomas Cleary -


..............................................................................................................................................

韓志和 Kara Shiwa(木鶴大明神)Kitsuru Daimyojin - Deity of the Wooden Crane
高山市川原町の中橋公園にある韓志和(から・しわ)の像。



木彫りやカラクリの技術に優れ、唐の皇帝・穆宗(ぼくそう)を驚嘆させたという。
この韓志和は飛騨の匠ではないかと考えられるようになった。
古くから飛騨の匠の高い技術が評価されていた事もあるのだろう。
飛騨国分寺にある木鶴大明神は、彼を描いた像といわれている。
自作の木鶴に乗って中国へ渡ったという韓志和。両手にはノミと槌が握られている。
- look at more photos
- reference source : gdn2425.jp/statue/s_takayama... -


- source : 飛騨高山まちの博物館


韓志和伝説 - Detailed study
- reference source : jiangnankejp03/book/jnihonzo... -

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. sennin 天狗と仙人伝説 Legends about Tengu and Immortals .

. sennin 仙人と伝説 Legends about Immortals .


. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- - #senninkanshiwa #kanshiwa #hidanotakumi -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::