2022/08/06

Welcome to Paradise !

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Welcome to Gokuraku 極楽 the Buddhist Paradise !

I will try and introduce information about the life of Shakyamuni Buddha
and a glossary of terms, many of them are kigo for Japanese haiku.

Paradise, Heaven 極楽 gokuraku and Hell 地獄  jigoku

ano yo あの世 the other world
haraiso はらいそ paradise (paraiso)
higan 彼岸 the other shore
joodo 浄土 Paradise of Amida
ka no yo かの世 the other world
. meido 冥土 冥途 the other world / yomi 黄泉 "the yellow springs" .
paradaisu パラダイス paradise, Paradies
raise 来世 afterlife, the world to come
rakuen 楽園 paradise, earthly paradise
shigo no sekai 死後の世界 the world after death
takai 他界 to die, to pass into the other world
tengoku 天国 heaven
tenjoo 天上 "up there", heaven

. toogen 桃源 Shangri-La シャングリラ, Arcadia, Eden - Toogenkyoo 桃源郷 fairyland, .
桃源郷 lit. Peach Blossom Valley

. raigoo, raigō 来迎 Raigo, the soul on the way to paradise .
"Decent of Amida Buddha", "Amida Coming over the Mountain"
- raigoozuu 来迎図 Raigozu, illustrations of the way to paradise


. Tokoyo no Kuni 常世国, 常世の国 The Eternal Land (of Shintoism) .
yomi 黄泉 the yellow springs, die Gelben Quellen
yuutopia ユートピア Utopia


And in the limbo toward the other world here are a lot of vengeful spirits, monsters and goblins.

. jigoku 地獄 Buddhist hell - Introduction .
naraku ならく / 奈落 hell, hades


. Pilgrimages in Japan - Introduction .


. - - - Glossary of Terms - - - . - not yet in the ABC index.

. Introducing Buddha Statues .

. Introducing Buddhist Temples 寺 .

. Famous Buddhist Priests - ABC-List .


Gabi Greve
GokuRakuAn 極楽庵, Japan


. Gokuraku Joodoo 極楽浄土 Gokuraku Jodo, Paradise in the West of Amida Nyorai .



..............................................................................................................................................


- - - - - ABC - Table of Contents - - - - -

- AAA - / - BBB - / - CCC - / - DDD - / - EEE -

- FFF - / - GGG - / - HHH - / - I I I - / - JJJ -

- KK KK - / - LLL - / - MMM - / - NNN - / - OOO -

- PPP - / - QQQ - / - RRR - / - SSS - / - TTT -

- UUU - / - VVV - / - WWW - / - XXX - / - YYY - / - ZZZ -


. Reference, LINKS - General Information .


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::





. Join the Jizo Bosatsu Gallery - Facebook .




. Join the Kannon Bosatsu Gallery on facebook .





. Join the Onipedia Demons on facebook .


under construction - please come back!
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- #gokuraku #jigoku #heavenandhell #priest -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2022/06/09

General Information

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

General Information and Reference


- - - - - - - - - - Latest Additions - - -

. Darumapedia - Temples and Gokuraku .

....................................................................................................................................................



A Tourist Guidebook to Paradise  
GokuRaku no Kankoo Annai 極楽の観光案内 by 西村公朝 Nishimura Kocho


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

- - - - - - - - - - External LINKS - - -


Buddhism in Japan - Buddha Statues - an extensive guide

A-TO-Z PHOTO DICTIONARY
source : Mark Schumacher



Buddhist Art News - Japan
News on Buddhist art, architecture, archaeology, music, dance, and academia.
- source : buddhistartnews.wordpress.com




地獄と極楽がわかる本 - to understand hell and heaven
source : futabasha.co.jp

..............................................................................................................................................

A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism
William E. Deal, Brian Ruppert




- quote -
Review by Jonathan Ciliberto
Intended for “upper-level undergraduate and graduate students as well as scholars,” A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism fills a gap by presenting largely recent work of Japanese and Western scholars on Japanese Buddhism. The authors consider prior books on Buddhist cultural history as largely from Indian and Tibetan viewpoints. The particular presumptions, intellectual models, or even prejudices of such positions (e.g., to view Japanese Buddhism as a distant reflection, or a corruption, of a continental original) are seen as obstacles to an accurate history of Buddhism’s influence and interaction with Japan.

The great value of the book is to direct readers to approaches and theories perhaps overlooked by more general histories of Buddhism. Each chapter includes its own bibliography and notes, making the book useful for study of narrow sections of Japan’s history.

Published in 2015, many summaries of and citations to recent scholarship are incorporated. Although a relatively short volume (~200 pages, absent notes and biolographies), it includes a great deal of purely historical information surrounded by “cultural history,” covering Japan from protohistory to the present. The book includes a character glossary.

Some themes that run through the book are: that Buddhism in Japan was not a monolithic “ism,” and that individual sects were not exclusive of one another but rather interacted in practice and doctrine; the complex interaction of indigenous religion with Buddhism; Buddhist lineages in Japan as the agents of cultural influence (e.g., “lineages had already begun to pursue the possibility of an ultimate deity”).

Many chapters include subsections on women and gender in Japanese Buddhism, including a fascinating section on the link between literary salons “established in women’s circles” and often held within monasteries and creating an environment for “the evolving and intimate connection between monastic Buddhists and their lay supporters” (102-4). More generally, these sections illustrate the important influence of women on Japanese Buddhism throughout its history. The book also devotes substantial attention to religion in Japan in the modern period, a much-needed resource.

One instance of a simplification of Japanese history that the authors seek to correct is the view that Shinto and Buddhism remained largely separate strands. While the doctrine of honji-suijaku is relatively well-known, the book reveals in greater depth the complex interplay between the two religions by reference to the writings of recent (and less-recent) scholars.

Another attempt to reveal subtlety beyond a stock scholarly view concerns (in the Heian period) the “limitations of the ‘rhetoric of decadence’ [that] some scholars attribute to ‘old’ Buddhism”. The authors offer Minamoto no Tamenori’s (d. 1101) Sanbo’e as an attempt “to incorporate other parts of the populace” beyond the aristocracy. This undercuts the claim that “practitioners of the ‘old’ Buddhism were completely unconcerned with those outside their walls” as a cause of the emergence of “religious heroes” (like Kukai and Nichiren) (88-90). (That said, the ongoing theme of Japanese Buddhists, unsatisfied with the quality of teaching in Japan, who sought original texts and more authoritative teachers in China, does support the basis of a kind of “decadent” Buddhism.)

It is important to have a sense of what “cultural history” is, or what it intends to do, before considering the authors’ approach to a history Japanese Buddhism. Given that cultural history includes an extremely wide set of approaches, determining the present authors’ use of it as a method is largely about picking out strands from the mass of possibilities. (One author refers to “the notorious difficulty of organizing the disorderly profusion of intradisciplinary, cross-disciplinary, and varying national-intellectual meanings and understandings of the “culture concept” into anything resembling consensual form” [Geoffrey Eley, “What Is Cultural History?”, New German Critique, No. 65, Cultural History/Cultural Studies, Spring – Summer, 1995, pp. 19-36].)

While the authors don’t set out their approach, generally in the present volume they tend to consider Buddhism in Japan less in terms of its religious or spiritual character or content and more as a generator of social and political forms. Or, rather, it is unspoken that religion was the driving force in developing myriad cultural effects in Japan, but the book doesn’t linger on religion itself, as it does on these effects.

It is unclear whether this approach is based on the position described by the scholar of medieval Japanese Buddhism Bernard Faure when he refers to an “absolute standpoint” as a “contradiction in terms” (Faure, Visions of Power (2000), 9). (Faure is frequently cited in A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism.) That is: there are no “religious” standpoints motivating individuals, in terms of absolute or ideal concepts, or at least that taking direction from such standpoints is delusional.

Faure’s view (following from Le Goff) is that “literary and artistic works of art (and, in the case of religion, ritual practice) do no represent any eternal, unitary reality, but rather are the products of the imagination of those who produce them” (Faure, 10, emphasis added). A similar view of religion advocates a “History of Religions approach – trying to figure out how and why certain forms of religiosity took shape the way they did instead of assuming that it was religious experience that made religion” (Alan Cole, Fathering Your Father (2009), xi).

Thus, Faure and historians who follow his approach write religious history absent of religion as an internal activity, aimed at self-improvement, transcendental, or altruistic. Or perhaps this approach simply considers individual “religious” experiences too personal, too psychologically opaque, to form the basis of historical inquiry, and thus discards consideration of such experiences as “religious” in nature, and instead consider them in mainly terms of materiality and politics.

The authors of A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism follow more directly the historian Kuroda Toshio’s sociopolitical functionalist approach. While occasionally offering descriptions of Buddhist practice and doctrine, the book largely focuses on: state-control over and connection with Buddhism in Japan (“Buddhism was firmly controlled by the state” during the early period (66)); art as narrative or purely visual, rather than a function of practice (99); Buddhist practice as a means of gaining influence or power at court, and the claim that “undoubtably” the introduction of esoteric lineages was related to the royal court’s interest in such power(106); that the court drove ritual (“Pivotal organizational and philosophical changes begin to arise in the royal court with the consolidation of the annual court ceremonies” (88, 106)).

Throughout, the authors take pains to connect influential Buddhists with the court: “The Daigoji halls, like those in other major monasteries, primarily housed scions of Fujiwara and Minamoto heritage” (107); “The Shingon lineages, from a very early point, […] had a special connection with the royal line” (108); “the intimate association between Tendai’s Enryakuji (Hiei) and the leading Fujiwaras” (108). Every monk who was a member of a royal family is identified in such a manner.

The author’s de-emphasis on “religious” explanations for religious history in Japan is intended to counterbalance writers who rely too much on such explanations. Citing the notable effect of D.T. Suzuki’s presentation of Zen Buddhism to the West (absurdist, gnomic, iconoclastic), and pointing out that “few Japanese Zen adherents, except those in the modern period and particularly those with access to the writings of Suzuki translated into Japanese” would recognize it, the author’s more social-science approach finds some justification. (146-7).

Performance theory is connected with the authors’ approach. A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism doesn’t lay any groundwork for the reader as to what the doctrine or technique of applying performance theory are. It is a notoriously amorphous field of inquiry. One description of the approach states that “the performative nature of societies around the world, how events and rituals as well as daily life [are] all governed by a code of performance,” and one sees how this aligns with Deal and Ruppert’s approach in the present volume: religious acts are not generated by authenticity, but rather are ritualized and “for show.” Performance theory is difficult to understand as contributing much to an analysis of history, since all human action is outward, and thus all actions are, in a literal sense, “performed.” The negative application of the theory is applied in the present volume: performance theory supports the strategy of avoiding examination the motivations, hearts, or minds of individual in Japanese Buddhist history.

This is a strategy for writing history, and indicates the above-mentioned scholarly caution, perhaps, but also it tends to paint individuals as acting according to a plan (or with hindsight), rather than by caprice, calling, sincerity, compassion, or irrationality. Perhaps it doesn’t matter, in terms of cultural history, whether or not an effect was caused by religion or some other motivation, but only that the effect did occur.

With regard to Buddhist art, the authors acknowledge – particularly as to poetry – that the “undoubted” motivation for including Buddhist themes was a recognition of the contrast between non-attachment and the “intoxication of those who made use of or found beauty in the linguistic arts” (102). Oddly – although in keeping with the author’s “non-religious” approach to religious art – the idea that such an aesthetic intoxication is meant exactly to advance individuals’ practice (e.g., through visualization) is never mentioned, with respect to poetry or any other art form.
- source : Buddhist Art News -

- reference -

..............................................................................................................................................


CLICK for more books !


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


BUDDHISM & SHINTŌISM IN JAPAN
A-TO-Z PHOTO DICTIONARY OF JAPANESE RELIGIOUS SCULPTURE & ART

- source : Mark Schumacher



Digital Dictionary of Buddhism - 電子佛教辭典 / Edited by A. Charles Muller
sign in as guest
- source : www.buddhism-dict.ne

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- #books #links #reference -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2022/05/11

Nagahama Shrine Izumo

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .
. Izumo no Kuni Shinbutsu Pilgrimage 出雲國神仏霊場編 .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Nagahama Jinja 長浜神社 Nagahama Shrine, Izumo


島根県出雲市西園町上長 / Shimane, Izumo, Nishizonocho, 上長浜4258

The Deity in residence is Yatsuka-mizuo-mitsunu / Yatsukamizuomitsunu-no-mikoto 
八束水臣津野命 - 八束水臣津野命の国引き kunibiki - pulling the land -

- quote
Nagahama Shrine is dedicated to the god Yatsuka-mizuo-mitsunu,
who is well-known for the Kunibiki land pulling legend
that appears in the ancient chronicles Fudoki.
The god is known as the god of improvement in sports and martial arts
and the protector of land and estate.
The shrine is located at the top of a mountain in the western area of Izumo
and is set in tranquil forested surroundings.
- source : visitshimane.com ...

When Yatsukamizuomitsunu no Mikoto finished dragging the lands and pierced the earth by a wood stick with a cry,
woods grew thickly that became  意宇社(おうのもり) "Ou no mori" (the Ou forest).

- quote -
Yatsukamizuomitsuno no mikoto n the Izumokoku fudoki the mountain is called Ōgamidake,
and Yatsukamizuomitsuno no mikoto is said to have used it as a rudder
when he brought in more land to extend Izumo Province (kunihiki).
- source : d-museum.kokugakuin.ac.jp .. -

- quote -
The Legend of Kunibiki - From Izumo-no-kuni Fudoki
One day, the god Yatsukamizuomizunu was muttering to himself,
“This nation of Izumo has just been created, and it is incomplete.
The land is narrow and cramped. When the gods made this land, they made it too small.
I shall find some extra land to add on here.”
Then, after looking across the sea to the land of Shiragi, he said, “There’s some spare land on the cape over there.” Grasping his plow, which was as wide as a young maiden’s breasts, he drove it into the land, as one would stab a large fish in the gills. Then, like one would cut apart that fish meat, he dug up the land and tied a large, strong rope to it. Then, like one would haul in frostbitten vines or gently, quietly pull a riverboat upstream, saying “Kuni ko (Land, come here), Kuni ko,” he pulled the land over to Izumo and added it on to the rift west of Kozu to make the land of Kizuki. The stake he used to hold the rope became Mt. Sahime, which towers above its surroundings on the border of Izumo and Iwami,
and the rope itself, became the coastline of Sono-no-Nagahama.
Next, after looking north across the sea to the area called Saki in the land of Oki, he said, “There’s some spare land over there, too.” Once again taking his plow, he sliced off that land and pulled it to Izumo, adding it on to the rift west of Taku to make the land of Sada.
Next, he said, “I also see some spare land in the area of Yonami in the land of Oki.” Again, he cut off that land and pulled it to Izumo, adding it on to the rift west of Unami to make the land of Kurami.
Then, after looking across the sea to the cape of Tsutsu in the land of Koshi, he said, “There’s some spare land there, too.” He cut of this land and pulled it to Izumo as well, adding it on to make the land of Miho.
The rope he used became the island of Yomi, and the stake he used to hold the rope became Mt. Hinokami in the land of Hoki. He surveyed his work and was satisfied.
“I am finished pulling land here.” Then taking his staff and driving it into the ground, he shouted “Oye!” (“That’s a job well done!”). It is likely that, over time, "Oye" gradually changed to "Ou", which is why that area is now named Ou.
- - - - - Visiting Locations featured in the Legend of Kunibiki
For starters, this myth describes how the entirety of the Shimane Peninsula was formed.
The rope that became Sono-no-Nagahama is the beach that stretches along the west coast of Izumo City, and the stake that held it in place, Mt. Sahime, is Mt. Sanbe in Oda City. The rope that became the island of Yomi is Yumi-ga-hama, a peninsula that runs from Yonago out to Sakai Minato. Long ago, that area was only an island unconnected to the mainland, but geographic changes over time have caused it to form that peninsula. The stake that held the island of Yomi in place, Mt. Hinokami, is Mt. Daisen in Tottori Prefecture. The staff that Yatsukamizuomizunu drove into the ground in Ou is said to have grown into a forest, and a solitary tree that stands out among the rice fields in the Chikuya area of Matsue is said to be what remains of that forest.
The new lands Yatsukamizuomizunu made are all parts of the Shimane Peninsula. Kizuki is the westernmost part of the peninsula, and it is the area where Izumo Taisha is located. Sada is the Hirata area of Izumo and Kashima area of Matsue. Kurami is the northern part of Matsue City, including areas of the Kashima and Shimane towns, and Miho is the easternmost part of the peninsula, where the Mihonoseki area of Matsue is located.
The other areas mentioned in this myth are also real places. Shiragi refers to the eastern part of the Korean Peninsula that was known long ago as the nation of Silla. Saki and Yonami were both areas of the Oki Islands, and Koshi was the name for the Hokuriku Region in Japan (Niigata, Toyama, Ishikawa, and Fukui Prefectures). It is said that the specific area of Koshi referred to here, Tsutsu, is the Noto Peninsula in Ishikawa Prefecture.
The Shimane Peninsula itself is an odd geographic feature of Shimane: a group of low-lying hills that rise quickly up from the Hikawa Plain and then drop off into the Sea of Japan. Looking at this area from higher up, like from the scenic viewpoints on Mt. Sanbe or Mt. Daisen, you can see how the land looks and even visualize how a myth like this could come to be.
- source : kankou-shimane.com ... -

..............................................................................................................................................

shuin 朱印 special stamp

shuin 朱印 stamp

.......................................................................

- Important Yearly Festivals 年中行事 -

妙見山桜まつり 3~4月 桜の開花期
彼岸桜、大島桜、染井吉野、山桜、八重桜と長期にわたり楽しめる。

国引きジャンボ綱引き大会
10月上中旬の日曜日 9:00~12:00
10人1チームで直径84㎜の太綱を境内の砂の上で引き合う。

国引きジャンボ福引き大会 綱引き大会の後、12:00~13:00
空くじなしのジャンボな福引き大会。
※綱引きの参加料は福引き券と交換される。
- reference : nagahamajinja ... -

.......................................................................

- - - - - Homepage of the Shrine
- source : shinbutsu.jp/shrines-temples ...
- reference source : nippon-reijo.jimdofree ... -



::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

This Shrine is Nr. 19 of the
. Izumo no Kuni Shinbutsu Pilgrimage 出雲國神仏霊場編 .

. kami 神 Shinto deities .

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. Temples with legends .

. Shrines with legends .

. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- - #nagahamajinja #nagahamashrine #kunihiki #Kunibiki ##izumoshinbutsu -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2022/05/10

Rokugo Manzan Kunisaki Oita

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Rokugo Manzan 六郷満山 Kunisaki Oita


.......................................................................

本山本寺 The 8 main important temples

後山金剛寺
吉水山霊亀寺
大折山報恩寺
鞍懸山神宮寺
津波戸山水月寺
西叡山高山寺
良薬山智恩寺
馬城山伝乗寺 - 真木大堂 Maki Odo はこの寺の堂宇であったとされる

中山本寺

足曳山両子寺 Futago-Ji
長岩屋山天念寺
金剛山長安寺
加礼川山道脇寺
久米山護国寺
黒土石屋(現本松房)
小岩屋山無動寺
大岩屋山応暦寺
補陀落山千燈寺
横城山東光寺

末山本寺

見地山東光寺
大巌山神宮寺
石立山岩戸寺
峨嵋山文殊仙寺
夷山霊仙寺
小城山宝命寺
龍華山成仏寺
参社山行入寺
西方山清浄光寺
懸樋山清巌寺

- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

- quote -
Rokugo Manzan Temples
The Kunisaki Peninsula's terrain consists of the 721 meter tall Mount Futago at the center and a series of valleys radiating from it. The region's tranquil countryside is dotted with dozens of temples and some shrines and was traditionally divided into six areas. The region was therefore collectively known as Rokugo Manzan (六郷満山),
which literally means "Six Towns Full Mountain".
The unique local religious culture of Rokugo Manzan contains elements of Buddhism, Shinto and mountain worship, and revolves around the peninsula's numerous temples and Usa Shrine. A noteworthy characteristic of the Rokugo Manzan culture is the predominance of stone statues of Buddhas and other deities and guardians.
Located close to the peak of Mount Futago is Futagoji (両子寺), a prominent temple with a history of more than 1300 years. Futagoji's grounds cover a wide area on the forested slopes of the mountain, with stone and gravel paths and stairs connecting several halls housing various deities.
A pair of stone Nio Guardians stand at the start of the traditional temple approach below the parking lot, from where a ten minute ascent up a flight of steps takes you to the main temple buildings. Among them are the Gomado Hall which is dedicated to Fudomyoo, a protector of Buddhism, and the Okunoin Hall, which enshrines the thousand-armed Kannon Bodhisattva. The more adventurous may climb up a slightly challenging path beyond the temple buildings to see several natural creations such as narrow openings through large rocks.
About 15 kilometers southwest of Futagoji stands Fukiji Temple (富貴寺), whose main hall is a designated national treasure. It is the oldest wooden structure existing in Kyushu, dating back to the late Heian Period. The simple, beautiful wooden temple building sits serenely with a backdrop of trees, and is featured widely in pamphlets on the Rokugo Manzan area.
Fukiji is dedicated to Amida Buddha, and its main hall houses an intricate wooden statue of the deity. In fact, the main hall of Fukiji is ranked as one of the top three Amida Buddha halls in all of Japan, along with Hoodo Hall at Byodoin Temple and the golden Konjikido Hall at Chusonji Temple.
Located just by the main road about five kilometers south of Fukiji Temple is Makiodo (真木大堂, Maki Ōdō), a temple that displays some outstanding, wooden images of Amida Buddha, the four heavenly kings and Fudomyoo in its treasure house. The original temple hall was lost in a fire about 700 years ago, but fortunately the wooden statues were rescued.
Less than five kilometers south of Makiodo are the Kumano Magaibutsu Stone Buddha (熊野磨崖仏), two large stone carvings into the walls of a cliff: an eight meter tall Fudomyoo and a nearly seven meter tall Dainichi Buddha. They are the largest Buddhist stone carvings in Japan, but are not as intricately sculpted as the Usuki Stone Buddhas, as they were carved into harder rock than the ones at Usuki.
- source : www.japan-guide.com ... -


. Kumano Magaibutsu 熊野磨崖仏 .

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

- quote -
Ninmon (仁聞) was a legendary monk
who is said to have founded 28 temples in various places in Kunisaki peninsula in Oita Prefecture in the Nara period. He was allso called Ninmon bosatsu (bodhisattva) and his name was also written as 人聞.
- - - - - Summary
Many of the esoteric Buddhism temples in Kunisaki peninsula, which were called
Rokugo-manzan (Mountain of Six Sanctuaries), have engi (writing about the history) which say these temples have been founded by Ninmon in 718. According to these engi, Ninmon first founded Sendo-ji Temple, then founded total 28 temples across the Kunisaki peninsula, and entered nirvana in Makura-no-Iwaya (cavern): the inner sanctuary of Sendo-ji temple, which was the first temple he founded. Also, many of the Magaibutsu (Buddha statues in cliffs and rocks) that still exist in Kunisaki peninsula, including Kumano Magaibutsu, are said to have been created by Ninmon. He is said to have made 69,000 Buddha statues. There is a theory that he founded Shusho-onie (fire festival).
These days, the theory that Ninmon was a fictional person is widely accepted.
Temples of Rokugo-manzan had actually been the places for mountain worship, which existed in Kunisaki peninsula since ancient times. These temples came to have the forms of the temples of Tendai sect from the end of Nara period to Heian period. As a result of fusion of the temples and Hachiman shinko, believing the God of War (Hachiman-god) and centering on neighboring Usa-jingu Shrine, unique Mountain Buddhism culture with syncretism of Shinto and Buddhism is thought to have been formed. A theory says that people who founded the temples include monks such as Horen, Kegon, Taino and Kakuman, who practiced together as disciples of Ninmon and served as betto (administrator of a Buddhist temple) of Miroku-ji Temple: a Jingu-ji Temple of Usa-jingu Shrine.
As for Ninmon, it is thought that he was a Buddhist expression of 八幡神Hachimanshin (God of War): an enshrined deity of Usa-jingu Shrine, or a god close to Hachimanshin.
Temples that are said to have been founded by Ninmon
Futago-ji Temple 両子寺
Fuki-ji Temple 富貴寺
Denjo-ji Temple 伝乗寺(真木大堂) (Maki Odo Hall)
Iwato-ji Temple (Kunisaki City) 岩戸寺 (国東市)
Tennen-ji Temple 天念寺
Sendo-ji Temple 千燈寺
- source : japanese-wiki-corpus ... -

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

- quote -
Bungotakada / Bungo Takada
Rokugo Manzan: A Heritage of Religious Acceptance
Rokugo Manzan Culture
- source : showanomachi.com/en ... -

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. Buddhist Temples and their Legends .

. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- - #rokugomanzen #manzan #kunisaki #yakushipilgrims -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2022/05/07

Iwatoji Yakushi Kunisaki

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .
. Buddhist Temples and their Legends .
. 49 Yakushi Temples in Kyushu 九州四十九薬師霊場 .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Iwatoji 岩戸寺 Iwato-Ji, Kunisaki
石立山 Ishidatezan, Ishidachizan (いわとうじ、いわとじ) 岩戸寺 Iwatooji

大分県国東市国東町岩戸寺1232番地 / Oita, Kunisaki town, Iwatoji

The Yakushi statue is made from wood and said to date to the Heian Period :

The main statue is 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O.

The temple was founded in 718 by Priest 仁聞菩薩 Ninmon Bosatsu.
At the entrance to the temple are two large 仁王像 Nio guardian statues.
The statue on the right, 阿形像, has a signiture of 1478.
In the compound is a large stone tower, 国東塔 Kunisaki To.
It has a signature of 1283.

- quote
Iwato Temple is one of the Rokugo Manzan Temples that is said to be opened in 718.
It used to have many monks, and it prospered during the Kamakura period.
Currently, the oldest Nio statue among those in the Kunisaki Peninsula stands in the entrance of the stone stairs.
On the right-hand side of the stone stairway, there is the main hall where Fudo Myoo is the main deity.
When you climb that stone stairway, you will reach the auditorium which was the main stage of the Shujo oni-e rituals.
Also, the "Kunisaki Tower", which is the oldest stone towers in the Kunisaki Peninsula, is an exciting place to visit.
This place is called Tateishiyama Iwatoji because it sealed the neck mound of Mongolian army's adversaries with stones.
The auditorium is also the stage of 修正鬼会 Shujo oni-e rituals.
- source : onie.jp/en/cultura/detail ...

. Rokugo Manzan 六郷満山 Kunisaki Oita .
and Ninmon Bosatsu.

岩戸寺修正鬼会 鬼面 Demon masks

..............................................................................................................................................

shuin 朱印 stamp

omamori お守り amulets

..............................................................................................................................................

Also on the following pilgrimage :

宇佐神宮六郷満山霊場 Usa Jingu Rokugo Manzan Reijo - Nr. 18番札所
a pilgrimage to 31 temples.
- reference : reijyoumeguri.usarokugo ... -


.......................................................................

- - - - - Homepage of the temple
- source : visit-kunisaki.com/spot ...
- source : oyakushi.com ...
- reference source : nippon-reijo.jimdofree ... -



::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

This temple is Nr. 10 of the pilgrimage
. 49 Yakushi Temples in Kyushu 九州四十九薬師霊場 .

. 薬師如来 Yakushi Nyorai Bhaisajyaguru .
the Buddha of Medicine and Healing

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. Temples with legends .

. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- - #iwatoji #Tateishiyama #kunisaki #yakushikyushu #yakushipilgrims #薬師如来 -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2022/05/06

Benten Edo 33 Pilgrimage

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Shinto Shrines (jinja 神社) - Introduction .
. kami 神 Shinto deities .
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Edo 江戸三十三ヶ所弁財天霊場 Pilgrimage to 33 Benten Shrines

The pilgrimage was established in 1780
as mentioned in 江府三十三ヶ所弁財天女縁起霊蹟誌.
Some statues are in a Shinto shrine, some in a Buddhist temple.
There are now many abandoned temples on the pilgrimage.


. Benten Shrines and Pilgrims in Edo .

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

01 八臂大辯才天 - 東叡山 寛永寺 Kanei-Ji  不忍池弁天堂
. 01 寛永寺 Kanei-Ji .
02 北野山 喜見院 Kiken-In 宝珠弁財天 廃寺 abandoned、
0? 柳井堂 心城院 Shinjo-In 天台宗 文京区湯島3 湯島聖天、江戸名水
. 0? Yushima Kannon 湯島観音 / 湯島聖天 Yushima Shoten 心城院 Shinjo-In .
03 出世弁才天・金山弁天 宝鏡山 円光寺 臨済宗妙心寺派 台東区根岸3 藤寺、根岸9古寺
04 出世弁才天・金山弁天 - 4番 延命山 栄寿院 出世弁才天・金山弁天 曹洞宗 足立区東伊興4 篠塚地蔵、隅田川21霊場
05 宝橋山 大聖院 白蛇弁才天 真言宗智山派 台東区北上野1 荒川辺88霊場
06 玉龍山 弘憲寺 延命院 水晶輪弁財天女 真言宗智山派 台東区元浅草4 御府内88霊場
. 06 玉龍山 Gyokuryuzan 延命院 Enmei-In 弘憲寺 Koken-Ji .
07 神田山 日輪寺 丈六弁才天 時宗 台東区西浅草3 芝崎道場、大東京100観音
. 07 日輪寺 Nichirin-Ji .
08 円乗院 Enjo-In 子安弁才天 天台宗 浅草寺 Asakusadera 廃寺 abandoned、
09 松寿院 Shoju-In 丈六弁才天・お多福弁天 天台宗 浅草寺中 Asakusadera 廃寺 abandoned

10 金龍山 浅草寺 Asakusadera 弁天堂 Benten Hall 銭瓶弁才天 聖観音宗 台東区浅草2 関東3弁天、浅草名所七福神、坂東33観音
11 明王院 Myoo-In 姥ヶ池弁才天 聖観音宗 台東区花川戸2 姥ヶ池、浅草寺の塔頭
12 待乳山 本龍院 山下弁天 聖観音宗 台東区浅草7 待乳山聖天、浅草名所七福神
. 12 本龍院 Honryu-In . .
13 無量山 福寿院 Fukuju-In 正真白蛇弁天 曹洞宗 台東区橋場1
14 即現寺 Sokugen-Ji 清雲山弁才天 臨済宗妙心寺派 墨田区東駒形1
15 亀命山 慈光院 Jiko-In 授福弁才天 曹洞宗 墨田区立花1
16 般若軒 Hannya-Ji 出世弁才天 廃寺 agandoned
17 諸宗山 無縁寺 Muen-Ji 回向院 子安弁才天 浄土宗 墨田区両国2 江戸33観音、鼠小僧次郎吉の墓所
. 17 回向院 Eko-In .
18 江島杉山神社 Enoshima Sugiyama Jinja 江島下之宮弁財天 神道 墨田区千歳1
19 幽遠山 玄信寺 Genshin-In 江島一体弁天 浄土宗 江東区深川2

20 海潮山 吉祥寺 Kichijo-Ji 真言宗 江東区木場6 廃寺 abandoned 、洲崎神社へ移動 ?洲崎神社 Sunosaki Jinja 神道 江東区木場6 洲崎弁天 Sunosaki Benten
21 鏡智山 大円院 Daien-In 覚真寺 Shinkaku-Ji 首尾弁才天 浄土宗 港区高輪2
22 泰叡山 護国院 瀧泉寺 天台宗 目黒区下目黒3 /目黒不動尊、江戸5色不動、江戸33観音 / 関東36不動、山の手七福神
. 11 瀧泉寺 Ryusen-Ji, Meguro Fudo .
23 松樹山 明王院 Myo-o In 天台宗 目黒行人坂 / 廃寺 abandoned、大円寺に吸収、大円寺阿弥陀堂が明王院の本堂
松林山 大円寺 Daien-Ji 天台宗 目黒区下目黒1 Meguro 山の手七福神
24 清光山 林泉院 安養寺 Anyo-Ji 浄土宗 新宿区住吉町
25 無量山 珠宝寺 Shuho-Ji 浄土宗 新宿区市ヶ谷富久町 廃寺
26 雲居山 宗参寺 Sosan-Ji 曹洞宗 新宿区弁天町
. 26 Sosan-Ji 宗参寺 and 27 竜福寺 Ryufuku-Ji .
27 天谷山 龍福寺 Ryufuku-Ui 南蔵院 Nanzo-In 真言宗豊山派 新宿区箪笥町 御府内88霊場
28 瀧河山 松橋院 金剛寺 Kongo-Ji 松橋弁才天 真言宗豊山派 北区滝野川3 滝野川16寺院、岩窟弁天、豊島88霊場
29 妙亀庵 -- 台東区橋場1 廃寺 abandoned、区立妙亀塚公園、吸収合併で総泉寺へ
妙亀山 Myokizan 総泉寺 Sosen-Ji 曹洞宗系単立 板橋区小豆沢3 曹洞宗江戸3ヶ寺

30 東光山 松平良雲院 西福寺 Saifuku-Ji 江島弁財天 浄土宗 台東区蔵前4 浄土宗江戸4ヶ寺触頭
31 功徳山 天龍寺 Tenryu-Ji 曹洞宗 足立区東伊興1
32 日登山 妙林寺 Myorin-Ji 田中愛敬弁才天 日蓮宗 谷中 廃寺 agandoned、桜やホタルの名所だったらしい
33 根津神社 Shrine Nezu Jinja 吹上弁才天 神道 文京区根津1 根津権現、東京10社

番外 明静山 円光院 大盛寺 Daisei-Ji 井ノ頭弁財天 天台宗 三鷹市井の頭4 井の頭恩賜公園内


- reference source : nippon-reijo.jimdofree.com -

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. Benten Shrines and Pilgrims in Edo .
[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- ##benten #benzaiten #bentenpilgrim -
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2022/05/05

Ozenji Kannon Asao

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .
. Buddhist Temples and their Legends .
. 小机領三十三所子歳観音霊場 Kozukue Nedoshi 33 Kannon .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Oozenji, Ōzenji 王禅寺 Ozen-Ji, Asao
星宿山 Shoshukuzan 蓮華蔵院 Rengezo-In 王禅寺 Ozenji


神奈川県川崎市麻生区王禅寺940 / Kanagawa, Kawasaki, Asao, Ozenji

The temple was founded in 921 by 無空上人 Priest Muku from Mount Koyasan.
The temple is located on a hill to the east of 王禅寺村 Ozenji village.
When 新田義貞 Nitta Yoshisada (1301 - 1338) was at war, it was burned down by his soldiers.
In the Muromachi period it was rebuilt as a sub-temple of 高野山 Koyasan.
Sometimes it is called 関東の高野山 The Koyasan of the Kanto Area.
In 1642 it got more land from the government and a pagoda was build.
There are many large old trees in the compound.
The Temple Ozen-Ji has the original 禅寺丸柿 Zenjimaru persimmon tree, which is a registered national treasure.

.......................................................................

- quote
王禅寺ふるさと公園 Ozenji Furusato Park
Ozenji Furusato Park was developed with themes of "Nature" and "Water" —
thanks to the abundant nature to be found in the Tama Hills area.
Views of Mount Fuji can be enjoyed from some parts, as well as tree-lined trails great for walks.
- source : trip.pref.kanagawa.jp/destination ...

..............................................................................................................................................

shuin 朱印 stamp

..............................................................................................................................................

- - - - - Homepage of the temple
- source : city.kawasaki.jp/asao ...
- reference : asao-kankou.jp ... -
- reference source : tesshow.jp ... -
- reference source : nippon-reijo.jimdofree ... -



::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

This temple is Nr. 22 of the pilgrimage
. 小机領三十三所子歳観音霊場 Kozukue Nedoshi 33 Kannon .
nedoshi 子年 (ねずみどし) refers to the year of the rat, 鼠 nezumi.

. Kannon Bosatsu 観音菩薩 Avalokiteshvara .

. Shō Kannon 聖観音 / 正観音 Sho Kannon / 聖観世音菩薩

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. Temples with legends .

. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- - ##ozenji #asao #kozuke #Kodukue ##kozukue ##kannon ##nedoshi -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2022/05/04

Susa Shrine Izumo

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .
. Izumo no Kuni Shinbutsu Pilgrimage 出雲國神仏霊場編 .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Susa Jinja 須佐神社 Susa Shrine, Izumo

島根県出雲市佐田町須佐730 / Susa, Sada-cho, Izumo City, Shimane


The Deities in residence are 須佐之男命 Susanoo no Mikoto.
and his wife, 稲田姫 Inada Hime (櫛名田比売 Kushinada Hime).
Also the parents of Inada-hime
Ashimazuchi-no-mikoto and
Temazuchi-no-mikoto

The shrine was founded in 776.
The priests of the shrine are said to be descendants of Ōkuninushi.

- quote
Susa Shrine is located deep in the mountians of Sada in Izumo.
According to the ancient chronicles, after the gods Susano and Kushinada got married at Yaegaki Shrine
and made Suga Shrine their home, they set off on their travels around the country.
When they returned to Izumo they fell in love with the area of Susa.
After giving birth to many gods and creating the country, Susano handed power over to his descendents,
and laid his soul to rest here.
Behind the main shrine hall is a giant cedar tree, which is said to be 1200 years old.
It has long been worshipped as a sacred tree, and it is believed to be the dwelling place of gods and spirits.
It has recently become a popular “healing” spot, as it has been named by a spiritual healer as one of the best energy sources in Japan.
There is a well in the shrine grounds, and it is said that Susano used the water from here to purify the area. Although the well is deep in the mountains, it contains sodium, and the water has recently been found to come from to the Sea of Japan.
The waters of the hot springs in the surrounding area also contain sodium, and are well-known for their high quality.
The area around the shrine offers some spectacular rural landscapes.
The pure water river alongside the shrine runs out into the Hiikawa River.
Mt. Sentsu at the source of the river is said the be the place where Susano descended from the Celestial Plain of heaven,
and it also features in the legend of Yamata-no-orochi, as the home of the eight-headed creature.
- source : google.com/search ...

..............................................................................................................................................

shuin 朱印 stamp - 須佐大宮

ema 絵馬 votive tablet

..............................................................................................................................................

kiriake shinji 切明神事(きりあけしんじ) special Nenbutsu Ritual
A aritual to pray for a good harvest, on August 15.
A kind of 念佛踊り Nenbutsu Dance Ritual.
Six dancers in special robes chant :
naamamidoo ナーマミドー」(南無阿弥陀仏) Namu Amida Butsu
- reference : izumo-kankou.gr.jp .. -

- quote
Commonly known as "Nenbutsu odori" (Buddha prayer dance) and designated as
Shimane Prefecture's intangible cultural treasure.
Decorated with flowers to welcome the Kami, and to pray for good autumn harvests.
Afternoon of 15th August.
- source : english.susa-jinja.jp -

. Namu Amida Butsu, the Amida Prayer .

..............................................................................................................................................

- - - - - Homepage of the Shrine
- source : shinbutsu.jp/shrines-temples/susajinja .. -
- reference : visitshimane.com ...
- reference source : nippon-reijo.jimdofree ... -



::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

This Shrine is Nr. 18 of the
. Izumo no Kuni Shinbutsu Pilgrimage 出雲國神仏霊場編 .

. kami 神 Shinto deities .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .


....................................................................... Shimane 島根県 

. Empress Jingu Kogo 神功皇后 / 神宮皇后 . (170 - 269)
When Empress Jingu Kogo was on her way to Korea,
there was a special Korean Dance at 須佐神社 the Shrine Susa Jinja.
The chant was:
はん(拝)なん(南)もう(方)ひい(日)てん(出)のう(邦) hon nan moo hi ten no.
It is a kind of nenbutsu odori 念仏踊 Nenbutsu Dance.
People have to recite this before starting to dance.
If they do not, the weather will turn bad and they have a bad harvest.

..............................................................................................................................................

- reference : Nichibun Yokai Database -

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. Shrines with legends .

. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- - ##susajinja #susashrine ##shinbutsuizumo ##izumoshinbutsu -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2022/05/03

Kokubunji Yakushi Miyako

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .
. Buddhist Temples and their Legends .
. 49 Yakushi Temples in Kyushu 九州四十九薬師霊場 .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Kokubunji 國分寺 Kokubun-Ji, Miyako
金光明山 Kongomyozan 豊前 國分寺 Buzen Kokubunji

福岡県京都郡みやこ町国分280 / Fukuoka, Miyako district, Miyako city, Kokubun

The main statue is 薬師如来 Yakushi Nyorai.

- Chant of the temple

三重塔 the three-storied Pagoda 県重文 an imoportant treasure of the prefecture
It was built in 1896.

..............................................................................................................................................

shuin 朱印 stamp

..............................................................................................................................................

- - - - - Homepage of the temple
- source : hakataboy.com/temple ...
- source : oyakushi.com ...
- reference source : nippon-reijo.jimdofree ... -



::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

This temple is Nr. 08 of the pilgrimage
. 49 Yakushi Temples in Kyushu 九州四十九薬師霊場 .

. 薬師如来 Yakushi Nyorai Bhaisajyaguru .
the Buddha of Medicine and Healing

. Kokubun-Ji Temples in Japan .

. Kokubun-Ji Temple Legends .

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. Temples with legends .

. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- - ###kokubunji #buzen #miyako #yakushikyushu #yakushipilgrims #薬師如来 -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2022/05/02

Mineji Izumo Mitoya

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .
. Buddhist Temples and their Legends .
. Izumo no Kuni Shinbutsu Pilgrimage 出雲國神仏霊場編 .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Mineji 峯寺 Mine-Ji, Mitoya
中嶺山 Nakaminezan 峯寺 Mineji

島根県雲南市三刀屋町給下 / Kyushita, Mitoya, Unnan, Shimane prefecture

The Kannon statue is 聖観世音菩薩 Sho Kannon Bosatsu.

- quote
Mineji Temple of Shingon sect in Izumo
The temple is located deep in the mountain of Oku Izumo.
One of the longest established Shingon sect temples and the seventh spot on the Izumo pilgrimage route.
The Unshu style Japanese garden, which was designed by the seventh feudal lord,
commonly known as 松平不昧 Fumai Matsudaira, is well known.
On a fine weather day, Lake Shinji and Shimane Peninsula can be overlooked from the top of Mt, Mineji Misen.
- source : into-you.jp/en ..

..............................................................................................................................................

shuin 朱印 stamp

.......................................................................

- Yearly Festivals 年中行事 -

初護摩祈祷(はつごまきとう) 1/2
節分・厄除け護摩供養 2/3
花の法要(ほうよう)・大般若会 Dai Hannya E 4/15
火祭り柴燈大護摩供養(さいとうだいごまくよう) 4/15
除夜の鐘・松明(たいまつ)行列 12/31
- reference : shrines-temples/mineji ... -


..............................................................................................................................................

Also on the following pilgrimages :

. Izumo 33 Kannon Pilgrimage 出雲三十三観音霊場 . - Nr. 09

.......................................................................

- - - - - Homepage of the Temple
- source : mineji.noomise ...
- reference source : nippon-reijo.jimdofree ... -



::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

This Temple is Nr. 17 of the
. Izumo no Kuni Shinbutsu Pilgrimage 出雲國神仏霊場編 .

. Kannon Bosatsu 観音菩薩 Avalokiteshvara .

. Shō Kannon 聖観音 / 正観音 Sho Kannon / 聖観世音菩薩

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

- quote -
Matsudaira Harusato 松平治郷 (1751 – 1818)
Matsudaira Fumai 松平不昧
a Japanese daimyō of the mid-Edo period, who ruled the Matsue Domain.
Fumai as Tea Master
His chanoyu mentor was Isa Kōtaku (1684–1745)
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. Temples with legends .

. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- - #mineji #minejiizumo #mitoya #shinbutsuizumo #izumoshinbutsu -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::